Why you should convert your space into a coworking space

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Ben Brockbank

18th August 2021

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The pandemic has undoubtedly changed our lives, and as companies and employees are adapting, the “new normal” is now becoming just “normal”.

With this in mind, the hot topic on everyone’s (especially the media’s) mind is, naturally, the future of work. This will undoubtedly be one of the largest shifts in organisational culture, and it’s clear to see that remote/flexible work is here to stay.

In fact, experts suggest that 74% of Fortune 500 CEOs believes there will be a reduction in office space. This begs the question: “What will happen to all that empty real estate?”.

The upcoming trend seems to be, you guessed it, converting unused office space into coworking spaces. Below are some trends and ideas on how coworking can enhance the return on your properties.

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Location Location Location

As with all real estate, the location of a coworking space is crucial. As society shifts to a hybrid working model (i.e. working several days a week in the office, and the other days at home), more and more people will explore alternatives to their often-unpractical home office.

There are limitations of working from home, (see our
other blog posts for a rundown of these) and especially for people living in the city, the likelihood that they have a separate office space or garden in their flat is small.

Many people will need a productive space away from their partners, kids, dogs – and this is where your new coworking office comes into play. Consequently – this means there are opportunities for coworking spaces in both central city locations, as well as suburbs. In fact, according to Deskmag’s coworking survey suggests, 60% of people who utilize coworking offices commute on average 5-30 min to work.


Building Layout

As with all real estate, the location of a coworking space is crucial. As society shifts to a hybrid working model (i.e. working several days a week in the office, and the other days at home), more and more people will explore alternatives to their often-unpractical home office.

Continuing on the theme of old working traditions being reformed, the focus on types of buildings has shifted slowly as well. In the past, the top floor office with an impressive view has been the ultimate sign of success in business.

But things are shifting for many workers.

In many metropolitan areas, coworking offices are located in prime locations on the bottom floor, with a more “laid back” exterior. An almost café-style layout encourages walk-ins, collaboration and productivity.

Furthermore, a coworking office does not need to simulate a traditional office: the simplicity of the concept is one of its biggest strengths. All it needs is a few desks, a strong internet connection, good coffee and you are good to go.


Effective Use of Space

Many coworking office divide their space into different areas. One-part open floor plan, one-part meeting rooms and sometimes certain areas for more permanent tenants.

The latter allows you to ensure revenue stability and higher customer retention with long-term tenants. Some other spaces decide to equip their locations with more specific rooms  such as a podcast recording room or meeting room. These are completely optional and can always be added later on in the process.

All things considered, converting a space into a coworking space is a quick and lucrative solution for unused facilities.

We have seen large hotel chains, office buildings and even store fronts dedicate areas of their facilities to coworking spaces, so why shouldn’t you give it a try? If you have an area that you have converted into a coworking office, join Opus to get more members into your location: 
https://www.opusnordic.com/become-a-workspace-partner.